tumbling down the heap

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Sep 13
Uber complex interior from Matisse. A painting to get lost in. 
Interior with Phonograph

Uber complex interior from Matisse. A painting to get lost in. 

Interior with Phonograph


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Sep 4
<3 this

<3 this

(Source: noirlac)


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The red cupboard 1939 - Pierre Bonnard

The red cupboard 1939 - Pierre Bonnard


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Sep 2
Iron Bridges at Asnières 1887 - by Émile Bernard

Iron Bridges at Asnières 1887 - by Émile Bernard


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Aug 30

I used to be a terrible glutton when it came to food and drink (especially drink - I was alcoholic) so I’m always sensitive to descriptions of gluttons in literature. I think I’ve found the grandaddy of them all in Spenser’s Faerie Queene.

"And by his side rode loathsome Gluttony,
   Deformed creature, on a filthie swyne,
   His belly was vp-blowne with luxury,
   And eke with fatnesse swollen were his eyne,
   And like a Crane his necke was long and fyne,
   With which he swallowd vp excessiue feast,
   For want whereof poore people oft did pyne;
   And all the way, most like a brutish beast,
   He spued vp his gorge, that all did him deteast.

In greene vine leaues he was right fitly clad;
   For other clothes he could not weare for heat,
   And on his head an yuie girland had,
   From vnder which fast trickled downe the sweat:
   Still as he rode, he somewhat still did eat,
   And in his hand did beare a bouzing can,
   Of which he supt so oft, that on his seat
   His dronken corse he scarse vpholden can,
In shape and life more like a monster, then a man.”

image


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Aug 28

Giacometti on the human head.

"The first time that I saw the head I was looking at become fixed, immobilized definitively in a moment in time, I shook with terror as never before in my life and a cold sweat ran down my back. What I was looking at was an object like any other, no, different, not like any other object, but like something which was alive and dead at the same time." 


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Jul 21

"But at my back in a cold blast I hear

The rattle of the bones, and chuckle spread from ear to ear.” 

TS Eliot’s The Wasteland is full of weirdness and fear. The line above is taken from part III of the poem, which is called The Fire Sermon.


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Jul 18

"We’re captive on the carousel of time/ We can’t return, we can only look behind" - lyrics of this song are actually terrifying

(Source: Spotify)


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Jul 14
I found an old book of Paul Gauguin&#8217;s letters (printed in the 1940s) in the secondhand floor of Chapters bookshop and I&#8217;m reading it at the moment. Here, in a letter from 1885 (around when he started seriously thinking about being a full time artist) to his friend, the painter Emile Schuffenecker, he talks about Cezanne, and seems to be describing the break with Impressionism.
"Look at Cezanne, the misunderstood, an essentially Eastern nature (he looks like an old man of the Levant). In his methods, he affects a mystery and the heavy tranquility of a dreamer; his colours are grave like the character of orientals; a man of the South, he spends whole days on the mountain top reading Virgil and looking at the sky. So his horizons are lofty, his blues most intense, and with him red has an amazing vibration. Virgil has more than one meaning and can be interpreted as one likes; the literature of his pictures has a parabolic meaning with two conclusions; his backgrounds are equally imaginative and realistic. To sum up: when we look at one of his pictures, we exclaim &#8216;Strange.&#8217;"
The painting is Still Life with Peaches by Gauguin.

I found an old book of Paul Gauguin’s letters (printed in the 1940s) in the secondhand floor of Chapters bookshop and I’m reading it at the moment. Here, in a letter from 1885 (around when he started seriously thinking about being a full time artist) to his friend, the painter Emile Schuffenecker, he talks about Cezanne, and seems to be describing the break with Impressionism.

"Look at Cezanne, the misunderstood, an essentially Eastern nature (he looks like an old man of the Levant). In his methods, he affects a mystery and the heavy tranquility of a dreamer; his colours are grave like the character of orientals; a man of the South, he spends whole days on the mountain top reading Virgil and looking at the sky. So his horizons are lofty, his blues most intense, and with him red has an amazing vibration. Virgil has more than one meaning and can be interpreted as one likes; the literature of his pictures has a parabolic meaning with two conclusions; his backgrounds are equally imaginative and realistic. To sum up: when we look at one of his pictures, we exclaim ‘Strange.’"

The painting is Still Life with Peaches by Gauguin.


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